Musings & Rants
17

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You’ve been really patient ‚ÄĒ more patient than I’ve been about World of Winx, that’s for sure. ūüėõ Sorry for dragging this out¬†so long. Let’s jump right into this!

I kept saying¬†in my reviews¬†that something made me write off Orlando¬†as a love interest for Musa. Only one of you got it right: a Winx fan called¬†SpiderBraids. He¬†wrote this in an email:¬†“Anything to do with the meta reference, perhaps? :-)”

Bingo! Remember¬†this line from the script reader in “Back in the Middle Ages” (7X08):

“Let me introduce to you The Rainbow Company…”

Admit it: you rolled your eyes at that one. So did I. “The Rainbow Company?” Really? ūüôĄ

That’s when I stopped taking Orlando and his troupe¬†seriously as characters. I think they were just Rainbow’s way of writing themselves into the show. Two more¬†possible hints:

  • Where did¬†“Back in the Middle Ages” and “The Fairy Cat” (7X09) take place? Medieval Italy. Not England. Italy.
  • The troupe’s¬†play was¬†about six fairies who save a dying kingdom. That could have been a reference to how Rainbow wasn’t well-known¬†till they created Winx Club, which helped them become a big name in the animation industry.

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If the troupe was¬†supposed to represent Rainbow, who did¬†each member represent? I’m not sure. I don’t know the company¬†well enough to match each character to a specific staff member. They could have even been based on inside jokes. All I¬†can do is¬†guess based on the little knowledge I have.

Let’s start with¬†Orlando. When I first watched those two episodes, I thought for sure¬†he was Iginio Straffi.¬†The reader implied¬†Orlando wrote the play,¬†just like Mr.¬†Straffi created¬†Winx Club. He also played the prince in the play, who believed in magic and atrracted fairies with his music. It felt to me like some sort of metaphor about imagination, but I might be reading into it. ūüėõ

Here’s another possiblity. Orlando might have been¬†Alessia Orlando, one of the Winx Club singers. That might¬†explain why he was a minstrel¬†(a pop singer of the past) and why he was interested in Musa. Why would Rainbow¬†base a male character after her? I don’t know. Maybe they¬†just named him after her.

What about the tall guy? He might have been Mr. Straffi, too. The reader said he was the leader of the company, and the guard captain interrupted the reader just before he said his name (as if it might have given it away). Also, he played the king and the queen in the play. That could have been a reference to how Mr. Straffi and his wife, Joanne Lee, are the co-CEOs of Rainbow.

I’m not sure about the reader or the donkey. They may¬†have been two of Rainbow’s writers, two of the animators, two of Mr. Straff’s friends ‚ÄĒ I don’t know. Someone with inside knowledge of the company might be able to tell right away. Read the rest of this post

Musings & Rants
41
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The fro seen ’round the net

Winx Club is racist.

That’s the latest charge against the show. It stems from a scene in “Miss Magix” (1X12), where a dark-skinned girl has a meltdown over her hairdo, which looks like a normal afro. A writer for a blog about black natural hair called it “a clear-cut case of racism and ignorance” and “yet another attempt to impress upon little Black girls that their natural beauty is a ‘catastrophe.'” (Full post here.)

Good grief.

I’m not gonna try to defend this scene. It’s been done already, and¬†the critics¬†aren’t listening. No matter what we say, the problem’s still the same: this¬†looks like an afro.

But I don’t agree the scene is racist. Calling it that implies the insult was intentional, and we don’t know that for sure. The blogger claims she does, but was she at Rainbow when they wrote the script? No. Neither were we.

All she knows is she’s offended. She’ll never know if this was meant to be offensive. She’s just guessing and reacting like we are. The difference is we know enough about Winx to give Rainbow the benefit of the doubt. She barely knows anything about it.¬†(Did you see version one of her post? She really skimped on the research. Screenshots below.)

Now her readers think the whole show’s racist. Some have said they’ll never let their kids watch it. One even slammed¬†the¬†fans who defended it, saying they¬†have “no concept of right and wrong.” Wow.

Those readers and that¬†blogger don’t know what they’re missing. In reality,¬†Winx Club is¬†one of the least racist, most diverse, and most progressive¬†cartoons¬†on TV.

Read the rest of this post

General
2

Back in December, the YouTube user bloomfan15 posted a Singapore News interview with Iginio Straffi and his wife Joanne Lee, the papa and mama of the Winx. They talk about why they wanted to create a show like Winx Club, the struggles of making a CGI movie (Mr. Straffi says something a bit awkward here), and the future of Rainbow S.p.A. This interview seems to have happened before Secret of the Lost Kingdom was released. Don’t worry‚ÄĒeverything is in English. The audio is poor, so you’ll have to turn up your speakers to hear everything…but I recommend not doing it right away. You’ll hear why when the video starts.

I also found a smaller interview with Mr. Straffi on a site called Italtrade.com. He mentions again where the idea for the show came from and how much Rainbow S.p.A. was worth that year. And…could there be a Japanese version of Winx Club in the future?