What If Wednesday
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Today’s “What If Wednesday” question: “What if we learned more about these three magic species?”

I know. That’s a weird question. 😛 Anyway, we barely know anything about them, even though they were all introduced in season one.

Who are they? Let’s take a look.

Elves

I ran into a fan on Instagram last week who didn’t know Palladium’s an elf. Can you blame them? Besides having pointy ears, he doesn’t stand out much from the other magic beings we’ve met.

Elves are a staple of fantasy series, so why are there so few of them in Winx Club? All we’ve seen are Palladium and these two at Musa’s show in “The Show Must Go On” (2X15):

See them in the pink and teal dresses? They look out of place, don’t they? Maybe they were headed somewhere else, heard music coming from Redfountain, and decided to stay for some entertainment. (Side note: there’s a weird animation error in this screenshot. Can you spot it?)

The only thing Rainbow has told us in the show about elves is they evolve. That’s why Palladium looked like a Keebler elf with a growth spurt in season one but now looks more like a high elf. Will we ever see him change again? Probably not — although he called it one of his “many teacher transformations,” which means it’s happened before.

What did he look like before season one? Maybe I don’t wanna know.

Anyway, one of the season six comics focuses on him. In #125: “The Kingdom of the Dark Elves,” the Winx travel to his realm through the Legendarium World to find his lost lover Athris. I won’t give the story away. Find out what happens for yourself. 🙂

I’d love to see that realm in the show. Where is it? Is it isolated from the rest of the Magic Dimension? Maybe that’s why we don’t see more elves in Magix.

Ogres

Season one, episode one. Bloom’s eating an apple in the Gardenia Park when a panicked Kiko scurries up and gestures for her to follow him. He leads her to a clearing where a sun fairy’s being attacked by a bunch of ghouls and an ogre.

That ogre, Knut, is the only one of his kind we’ve seen to this day. Where’s the rest of them? Did the Specialists wipe them out?

Also, why is he allowed to roam freely? Aren’t ogres are treated like monsters? Yet the optics shop owner in Magix City didn’t have a problem with him trying on glasses!

To be honest, I don’t care where Knut comes from. I also don’t care why he’s not Alfea’s janitor anymore. Or maybe he is, but it doesn’t matter because he’s such a minor character.

But he still makes this list because we don’t much about ogres, and — to be fair — he played a big role in bringing the Winx Club together.

Leprechauns

I understand not knowing Palladium’s an elf. Without the ears, he could pass as a regular guy with long hair. But what else could Wizgiz be besides a leprechaun? You could put him on a box of Lucky Charms, and no one would know the difference!

Just like Knut, Wizgiz is the only one of his kind that we’ve seen. Where is he from? We know he’s got a home somewhere, since he left Alfea to visit his mom in “A Friendship Sundered” (1X08).

Wait a minute. How can he have a mom? Aren’t all leprechauns little bearded men?

Also, how old is he? The season two and three version of the website said he’s been teaching at Alfea for more than 1,000 years! Good grief!

Final Thoughts

If I had to pick one species I’m the most interested in, it would be the elves. I’ve always liked elves. Plus, Palladium’s one of my teachers.

What other magic species do you wanna know more about?

That’s it for today!

What If Wednesday
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Today’s “What If Wednesday” question: “What if the schools in the Magic Dimension let in more students from Earth?”

The Winx brought magic back to Earth three years ago. That means new fairies, witches, wizards, Specialists, Paladins, and more are waiting to be discovered. Someone has to train them — or else their skills will never grow, and magic won’t spread on Earth.

Queen Nebula knew that. That’s why she turned Tir Na N’Og palace into a fairy school. Maybe more magic schools will pop up on Earth one day. But Alfea, Cloud Tower, and Redfountain are the most famous schools in the Magic Dimension. They should open their doors to these students, too.

Of course, admitting Earth students wouldn’t be easy. First of all, how would they get to the Magic Dimension? Portals? Magic keys like in Regal Academy?

Second, could the students adjust to living in a realm where magic is everywhere? Bloom and Roxy have done well, but not everyone would have a fairy club to support them. Also, they wouldn’t understand what magic really is and what it’s for. Even Bloom had the wrong idea at first, thanks to fantasy books and fairy tales. Maybe the schools should create a curriculum to teach Earth students about magic life.

Finally, how would the students from the Magic Dimension treat the Earth students? Would they accept them or give them a hard time? The professors might have to teach them to be patient and helpful.

The novelty of “Winx on Earth” is fading. If the girls start helping people from Earth adjust to life as magic beings, that might make this gimmick interesting again.

That’s it for today!

Musings & Rants
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"Hina Logic" PowerI love talking to my brother. He sees the world so differently from anyone else I know, and I always learn something new or see an old topic from a new angle. A couple weeks ago — July 4th, I think — we got on the subject of shows and movies where the characters use magic. (Yes, he’s a geek, too. 😛 )

It started when I told him about a new magical girl/fantasy-action anime called Hina Logic: From Luck & Logic. He watches more anime than I do, so he can tell right away if a story will be cliché. Takes place in a high school? Has a clumsy airhead as the main character who’s somehow a prodigy? Uses its most important terms so often, you get sick of hearing them (for this show, it’s “Logicalist,” “Foreigner,” and “Trancing”)?

I’m not sure how many anime I just described.

My brother wasn’t interested, and one of his reasons surprised me. In shows where the main characters have magic powers, he doesn’t like it if:

  • They’re constantly impressed by them, even they’re common
  • They don’t use them for everyday things

At the time, he was playing an MMO. He wasn’t thinking about where his computer came from or what powers it. It just worked. But a century ago, no one could have imagined pressing buttons to control a creature from another world inside of a black box. That would look like magic to them!

He told me to look around at the objects in the room. What were we doing with them right then? How did I feel about them? My answer was something like this: “We’re doing the best we can with what we have, but we don’t have magic.”

What I meant was we were using the resources we have in our world: paper, plastic, electricity, etc. We use them for everyday things like drying our hair or cooking food. Some of them are limited, but we’re trying to reuse them or find more sustainable sources.

Why aren’t more fantasy worlds like that? If magic is abundant like electricity, shouldn’t the characters use it the same way we use our resources? An example my brother gave was in the movie Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them. When Tina takes Newt and Jacob to the house where she and her sister live, the two witches use magic to make them dinner. The potatoes, carrots, fruits, plates, bowls, and rolling pin move on their own.

Jacob the muggle — I mean “no-maj” — was amazed, but Newt and the witches didn’t bat an eyelash. They probably do things like that every day and don’t even think about it. If they have magic, why not use it to make their lives easier? Isn’t that what we muggles use technology for: convenience?

My brother couldn’t think of another show or movie that portrays magic as “ordinary” — especially not an anime. Instead, in many fantasy stories, the characters only use magic as a last resort. They live their everyday lives as if they’re human.

What about Winx Club? Sometimes, the Winx use magic for mundane things like trying on dresses or pouring tea. Alfea’s lights and the flying cars in Magix City are powered by magic. Yet the characters still have to conserve their energy, and their lives don’t feel much different from ours. Does that count as magic being integrated into everyday life?

Also, people who have magic powers are treated like they’re special, but they shouldn’t be. Almost everyone’s a fairy, a witch, an elf, a wizard, or some other magic being. Their power sources may be unique, but that’s it. To paraphrase The Incredibles, when everybody’s super, no one is.

What do you think? Am I wrong? Is magic in Winx Club treated as special or ordinary?

Side note: By the way, my brother eventually watched Hina Logic. Neither of us likes it. 😛

Video
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Now this is a surprise! Rainbow made a video of ALL the Winx’s transformations from seasons 1-7! That includes Charmix from seasons one, two, and the Nick specials; the 3D Enchantix, Believix, and Sirenix from the movies; and Roxy and Daphne’s transformations. (Roxy’s grouped with Believix, while Daphne’s grouped with Bloomix even though she’s a Sirenix fairy.)

With eleven years worth of footage to go through, something was bound to get left out. They forgot Aisha’s Charmix/Magic Winx transformations — both from the original and the Nick specials. That’s a shame. Her Charmix is my favorite. 🙁

Still, the video’s worth watching for nostalgia. Bon appétit, Winx fans!

Musings & Rants
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Nabu’s a difficult character to talk about, since he’s hands down the fan favorite in the Boys Club. He stood out because of his skin tone, because he wasn’t a Specialist, and because he was able to use magic like the Winx. Also, like his eventual fiancée Aisha, he showed some leadership ability. The Specialists took orders from him at times instead of Sky.

He also had the closest and most meaningful relationships. Obviously, he and Aisha were deeply in love, which made some of their friends jealous. Riven, during his drama with Musa in season four, often went to him for advice or just an ear to listen. The two of them became best friends, to the point where Riven cried after his death.

The funny thing about his relationship with Aisha is most fans just remember them as the happiest couple in season four. But when Nabu (a.k.a. “Ophir”) was first introduced in season three, Aisha hated him. She’d sworn off guys at that point in her life, and having one stalking her annoyed her to no end. Let’s look back at their love story.

Did I just call Nabu a stalker? Yes, I did. 😛 It doesn’t matter how nice he was. If you’re watching someone through a telescope while hiding in the bushes, following them wherever they go, then lying about it when you get caught, you’re a stalker. Plain and simple.

When Aisha meets him in “Valtor’s Box” (ep. 3X18), she scolds him for “slinking around” and eavesdropping, then races off in a huff. Later in “The Red Tower” (ep. 3X21), when she discovers he snuck onto the Owl before their mission to the Golden Kingdom, she tackles him and tries to put him in a headlock. (He was invisible, so she ends up grabbing his feet instead.) He introduces himself as “Ophir” and tries to be friendly with her, but she doesn’t trust him.

The others agree he can’t be trusted. After all, thanks to him, Valtor was able to steal the Agador Box in ep. 3X18. Aisha and Tecna think he’s Valtor’s spy, so Musa puts magic-sealing handcuffs on him and Aisha decides to lock him up in the brig of the ship. Unfortunately, thanks to some bad timing by Timmy, they get locked up together. 😛

This is when they finally get a chance to talk, and Aisha finds out they have things in common: they like the same music and have a similar rebellious attitude (revealed by Nabu’s favorite line in their favorite song: “No one makes decisions for me but me”). Later, he shows off some surfing skills he learned “from a wave wizard on Andros.” Aisha’s very impressed.

In “The Wizard’s Challenge” (ep. 3X23), he finally tells her his real name and why he’d been stalking her: he wanted to know more about her, since his parents had picked her to marry him. He also reveals, to Aisha’s surprise, that he rebelled against their decision and ran away from home. But in the end, he fell in love with her on his own.

What I like about their romance is everything worked out for them and their parents. In most stories where a kid rebels against their parents, the kid ends up being right for “following their heart,” and the parents look like fools who didn’t understand their child’s needs. But Nabu and Aisha fell in love anyway, which proved their parents had picked the right partners for them. It was a good twist.

In season four, Rainbow tricked into thinking they were about to settle down into a happy life together. He proposes to her in “Winx Club Forever” (ep. 4X11), and they start talking about where they want to live (Earth was a possibility). It was all to lull us into a false sense of hope.

Then two episodes before the end of the season, Nabu gives his life to save Roxy’s people. Just like that, he’s gone forever. It was a bold move for a show aimed at girls as young as four years old. Read the rest of this post