On the forums. The YouTube channels. The blogs. One false accusation after another. “Nick changed this! Nick changed that!”

“Nick changed Layla’s name to Aisha!”
For the millionth time, Aisha is her original name (that is, her Italian name)!

“…Nick changed Bloom’s mom’s name.” (From an Amazon review of Lost Kingdom)
I heard “Marion,” which is the name shown in Bloom’s profile on the official Italian website. It’s legit.

Remember this tirade after the first special?

“Now, what was the purpose of switching the everyday wear of the girls? Was that supposed to improve it in some way? ‘Cause Nick ol’ buddy, I see no difference. Nor with calling them fairies and not addressing their special powers as a type of winx. That’s right, their powers were once called winx….I’ll stick to watching the original online.”

(Bolded for emphasis.)

Not touching the “powers called winx” thing again, but 4Kids did call the Winx “fairies.” Many times. (Sparkling wings, glitter dust trails—what else could they be?)

Blah, blah, blah, confused fans, blah, blah, blah. I know I’ve beaten that topic to death. I’m just annoyed with people blaming Nick for changes they didn’t make.

Not that they haven’t changed anything. After all, they (and Rainbow) want to make this Italian show appeal to an American audience. The U.S. might be the only country that hasn’t caught Winx fever.

WHAT NICK HAS REALLY CHANGED
So, what has Nick truly changed? Here’s a partial list.

  • The voice actors: Obviously.
  • Aisha’s power source: Sort of. They relabeled it. Honestly, it’s always been hard to describe. You can’t call her “the fairy of water” or “the fairy of Morphix” because she can control—I almost said “bend” :P—all liquids. Does “fairy of waves” work? I say “no,” but it’s better than the alternatives. Fairy of liquids? Fairy of fluids? Way too awkward.
  • Ron’s name: Who’s Ron, I hear you ask? That random pixie cat from Secret of the Lost Kingdom. (Yes, he’s cute, but you know Rainbow just wanted to sell a plush toy.) Nick changed his name to “Purr.” Whatever. It’s not like he’s an important character. But it still counts as a name change.
  • Lots of dialogue: I can’t be the only one who’s yelled, “That’s not what she said in the other dub!” at the screen countless times. Nick’s had some fun with the script. Sometimes the new lines work. Sometimes—not so much. Your mileage may vary, of course.

(Like I said, this is a partial list. If you’ve caught other changes, feel free to comment!)

DO THE FOUR SPECIALS COUNT?
In my opinion, they don’t. Why were they made? To catch the new fans up fast, to get to the new seasons sooner, and to save us older fans from sitting through all 52 episodes of seasons one and two for the umpteenth millionth time. (If they’d wanted to kill the Winx revival right away, that would have done it for sure.)

That said, new fans did get the seriously abridged version. Lots of room for confusion.

Example: In the last special, “The Shadow Phoenix,” Professor Avalon was revealed as Lord Darkar in disguise. But originally, one of Darkar’s minions had disguised himself as Avalon, but the real Avalon arrived at the end of the season.

Which means new fans saw Lord Darkar teaching at Alfea in season three. What’s wrong with that?

Again, your mileage may vary. Maybe the changes in the specials count to you.

The moral is Nick hasn’t changed as much of Winx Club as some fans think. You don’t have to like the Nick dub, but it is closer to the original. At least Nick’s trying.

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